Procedures

Initial Oral Exam

This is one of the most important steps toward good dental health. It's more than just looking for cavities! We will ask you how you've been feeling, if you have any pain, discomfort or anything else that has been bothering you about your dental health.

At this exam, the dentist or hygienist will:

  • Check overall dental health and hygiene
  • Look for signs of tooth decay, root decay and gum disease
  • Evaluate your need for tooth replacement
  • Remove deposits and stains from your teeth
  • Inspect for any signs of oral cancer

We often perform X-rays as part of the exam. These x-rays are quick and painless, although some people find them mildly uncomfortable. They are powerful tools that give detailed images, allowing us to quickly find hidden problem and determine how serious they are. If there is a problem, our quality x-rays will help us design a treatment plan just tailored to your specific needs.

We'll ask you about other health issues you have that may impact your dental health. For example, some prescription medicines can cause dry mouth, which may increase the risk of tooth decay. Diabetes sometimes carries an increased risk of gum disease. We'll also talk to you about lifestyle factors that can impact your dental health, such as smoking, diet and other risk factors and provide information on how to keep your mouth healthy.

By the end of the exam, you'll have a good idea of your dental health, options to deal with any issues we've discovered and information to help you keep your mouth healthy for the long run.

The initial oral exam is your first step toward good dental health!

Children's Dental Health

The unique needs of children are a special focus for our staff. Education and proper care is even more important because these early years can start them on the path to a lifetime of good dental health. Making sure their teeth stay healthy requires the parents, Trenton Family Dental Care and the child all working together.

The information in this section is a useful guide for parents. Please consult with Dr. Basava when you have any questions about your child's dental needs.

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

You can help prevent your baby from getting cavities or developing what is called Baby Bottle Tooth Decay or Early Childhood Caries, by beginning an oral hygiene routine within the first few days after birth. Start by cleaning your baby’s mouth by wiping the gums with a clean gauze pad. This helps to remove plaque that can harm erupting teeth. When your child's teeth begin to come in, brush them gently with a child's size toothbrush and water. For bottle feedings, place only formula, milk or breast milk inside and avoid using sugary beverages such as juice or soda. Infants should finish their bedtime and naptime bottle before going to bed.

Dental Emergencies

Accidents can happen anywhere, anytime. Knowing how to handle a dental emergency can mean the difference between saving and losing your child’s permanent teeth. For all dental emergencies, it’s important to take your child to the Trenton Family Dental Care or emergency room as soon as possible.

Here are some tips if your child experiences a common dental emergency:

  • For a knocked-out tooth, keep it moist at all times. If you can, try placing the tooth back in the socket without touching the root. If that’s not possible, place it in between your child’s cheek and gum, or in milk. Call Dr. Basava right away.
  • For a cracked tooth, immediately rinse the mouth with warm water to clean the area. Put cold compresses on the face to keep any swelling down.
  • If your child bites his tongue or lip, clean the area gently and apply a cold compress.
  • For toothaches, rinse the mouth with warm water to clean it out. Gently use dental floss to remove any food caught between the teeth. Do not put aspirin on the aching tooth or gum tissues.
  • For objects stuck in the mouth, try to gently remove with floss but do not try to remove it with sharp or pointed instruments.

Thumb sucking

Sucking is a natural reflex and infants and young children may suck on thumbs, fingers, pacifiers and other objects. It may help them relax or make them feel safe or happy. Most children stop sucking by age 4. If your child continues to thumb suck after the permanent teeth have come in, it can cause problems with tooth alignment and your child’s bite. The frequency, duration and intensity of a habit will determine whether or not dental problems may result. Children who rest their thumbs passively in their mouths are less likely to have difficulty than those who vigorously suck their thumbs. If you are worried about your child’s sucking habits, talk to Dr. Basava.

Sealants

Sealants act as a barrier to prevent cavities. They are a plastic material usually applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (premolars and molars) where decay occurs most often.

Thorough brushing and flossing help remove food particles and plaque from smooth surfaces of teeth. But toothbrush bristles cannot reach all the way into the depressions and grooves to extract food and plaque. Sealants protect these vulnerable areas by "sealing out" plaque and food.

Sealants are easy for your dentist to apply. The sealant is painted onto the tooth enamel, where it bonds directly to the tooth and hardens. This plastic resin bonds into the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) of the chewing surfaces of back teeth. The sealant acts as a barrier, protecting enamel from plaque and acids. As long as the sealant remains intact, the tooth surface will be protected from decay. Sealants hold up well under the force of normal chewing and may last several years before a reapplication is needed. During your regular dental visits, your dentist will check the condition of the sealants and reapply them when necessary.

The likelihood of developing pit and fissure decay begins early in life, so children and teenagers are obvious candidates. But adults can benefit from sealants as well.

Key ingredients in preventing tooth decay and maintaining a healthy mouth are:

  • brushing twice a day with an ADA-accepted fluoride toothpaste
  • cleaning between the teeth daily with floss or another interdentally cleaner
  • eating a balanced diet and limiting snacks
  • visiting your dentist regularly

Ask us about whether sealants can put extra power behind your prevention program.

Fluoride treatment is another protection option. If you, or a family member, are at a moderate-to-high risk of developing caries, a professional fluoride treatment can help. The fluoride preparation used in the our office is a much stronger concentration than that in toothpastes or fluoride mouth rinses that may be available in a store or at a pharmacy.

Our fluoride treatments generally take just a few minutes. The fluoride may be in the form of a solution, gel, foam or varnish. Typically, it is applied with a cotton swab or brush, or it is used as a rinse or placed in a tray that is held in the mouth for several minutes.

After the treatment, you may be asked not to rinse, eat or drink for at least 30 minutes to allow the teeth to absorb the fluoride and help repair microscopic carious areas.

Depending on your oral health status, fluoride treatments may be recommended every three, six or 12 months. Ask Dr. Basava about the advantages of fluoride treatment and if it's right for you.

Invisalign

We all know how braces can straighten a crooked smile but many people, especially adults, don't want the look of traditional braces. The answer is Invisalign, the modern, simple way to straighten that smile. They offer a number of advantages over the old metal braces:

  • the braces are clear and barely noticeable
  • more comfortable than old style braces
  • removable so you can eat and drink as normal
  • often take less time than old style braces to accomplish your goal, often less than half as long
  • less risk of tooth decay and gum problems sometimes associated with traditional braces

If you've dreamed of an end to crooked teeth, ask Dr. Basava about Invisalign. She'll evaluate your smile and explain the advantage of Invisalign and develop a personalized plan that will explain what kind of results you can expect and how long it will take. Let Invisalign give you the smile you've always wanted!

Please visit http://www.invisalign.com for more information.

Cosmetic Dentistry

You want your teeth to look good so you can have a big, beautiful smile. If you have stained, broken or uneven teeth, cosmetic dentistry can help. Cosmetic dentistry is different from orthodontic treatment, which can straighten your teeth with braces or other devices.
Cosmetic dental procedures include:

  • Bleaching to make teeth whiter
  • Repairing chips or rough spots with fillings that match your teeth
  • Filling cavities with tooth-colored materials
  • Reshaping teeth that don't match the others
  • Closing gaps between teeth
  • Covering broken teeth with porcelain crowns and veneers

Talk to Dr. Basava about any cosmetic concern you have. After an evaluation, she will explain the options and develop a personalized treatment plan. At Trenton Family Dental Care, we believe looking good is part of feeling good!

Fillings

We offer tooth colored, mercury free fillings.

Veneers

Veneers are thin, custom-made shells crafted of tooth-colored materials designed to cover the front side of teeth. They are an option for correcting stained, chipped, decayed or crooked teeth. Veneers are made by a dental technician, usually in a dental lab, working from a model provided by Dr. Basava. Placing veneers is usually an irreversible process, because it's necessary to remove a small amount of enamel from your tooth to accommodate the shell. You may need to avoid some foods and beverages that may stain or discolor your veneers such as coffee, tea or red wine. Sometimes a veneer might chip or fracture. Dr. Basava can explain the benefits and concerns with veneers.

Crowns and Bridges

If you want a smile that’s your crowning glory, you may need a crown to cover a tooth to help restore it to its normal shape and size.
What is a crown? It's basically a tooth-shaped "cap" that is placed over a tooth to cover the tooth to restore its shape and size, strength, and improve its appearance. When cemented into place, a crown fully encases the entire visible portion of a tooth that lies at and above the gum line.

A crown can help strengthen a tooth with a large filling when there isn’t enough tooth remaining to hold the filling. Crowns can also be used to attach bridges, protect a weak tooth from breaking or restore one that’s already broken. A crown is a good way to cover teeth that are discolored or badly shaped. It’s also used to cover a dental implant.

Similarly, a bridge can help restore your smile if you’re missing one or more teeth.

Sometimes called a fixed partial denture, a bridge replaces missing teeth with artificial teeth and literally “bridges” the gap where one or more teeth used to be. Bridges can be made from gold, alloys, porcelain or a combination of these materials and are attached to surrounding teeth for support. Unlike a removable bridge, which you can take out and clean, a fixed bridge can only be removed by a dentist.

An implant bridge attaches artificial teeth directly to the jaw or under the gum tissue. Depending on which type of bridge your dentist recommends, its success depends on the foundation. So it’s very important to keep your remaining teeth healthy and strong.

If your treatment plan calls for a crown or bridge, Dr. Basava will use the most advanced procedures and materials to make the process as easy as possible and to ensure a comfortable fit. Dr. Basava will also explain what you need to do to take care of your crown or bridge and keep you smiling!

Implants

If you are self-conscious because you have missing teeth, wear dentures that are uncomfortable or don't want to have good tooth structure removed to make a bridge, talk to Dr. Basava to see if dental implants are an option for you.

Dental implants are a popular and effective way to replace missing teeth and are designed to blend in with your other teeth. They are an excellent long-term option for restoring your smile. In fact, the development and use of implants is one of the biggest advances in dentistry in the past 40 years. Dental implants are made up of titanium and other materials that are compatible with the human body. They are posts that are surgically placed in the upper or lower jaw, where they function as a sturdy anchor for replacement teeth.

Most patients find that a dental implant is secure, stable and a good replacement for their own tooth. There are generally three phases to getting an implant:

  • First, the doctor surgically places the implant into the jawbone. You may need to follow a diet of soft foods, cold foods and warm soup during the healing process.
  • Next, the bone around the implant heals in a process called osseointegration. What makes an implant so strong is that the bone actually grows around it and holds it in place. Osseointegration means “combines with the bone” and takes time. Some patients might need to wait until the implant is completely integrated, up to several months, before replacement teeth can be attached to the implant. Other patients can have the implants and replacement teeth placed all in one visit.
  • Finally, it’s time for the placement of the artificial tooth/teeth. For a single tooth implant, Dr. Basava will customize a new tooth for you, called a dental crown. The crown will be based on size, shape, color and fit, and will be designed to blend in with your other teeth. If you are replacing more than a single tooth, custom-made bridges or dentures will be made to fit your mouth and your implants. (Note: The replacement teeth usually take some time to make. In the meantime, we may give you a temporary crown, bridge or denture to help you eat and speak normally until the permanent replacement is ready.)

If you are interested in dental implants, let Dr. Basava evaluate you and explain all the options to you.

Root Canal

A root canal was once dreaded but thanks to advances in dental science, it is typically a relatively simple procedure with little or no discomfort involving one or two visits. Best of all, it can save your tooth and your smile.

Root canal treatment is necessary when the pulp (soft tissue inside your teeth containing blood vessels, nerves and connective tissue) becomes inflamed or diseased. During root canal treatment, Dr. Basava removes the diseased pulp. The pulp chamber and root canal(s) of the tooth are then cleaned and sealed. If the infected pulp is not removed, pain and swelling can result, and your tooth may have to be removed.

Causes of an infected pulp could include:

  • a deep cavity
  • repeated dental procedures
  • a cracked or broken tooth
  • injury to the tooth (even if there’s not a visible crack or chip)

If you continue to care for your teeth and gums your restored tooth could last a lifetime. However, regular checkups are necessary; a tooth without its nerve can still develop cavities or gum disease.

We often hear patients say their root canal "wasn't near as bad as I thought it would be."

Extractions

An extraction means to have a tooth removed, usually because of disease, trauma or crowding.

If you need an extraction, we will first numb the area to lessen any discomfort. With modern anesthesia, there is much less pain and discomfort than in the past. We also offer laughing gas to make the process even easier.

Here are some tips to follow to make recovery easier:

  • Avoid anything that might prevent normal healing.
  • Don’t smoke or rinse your mouth vigorously.
  • Avoid drinking through a straw for 24 hours.
  • Follow the diet your Dr. Basava suggests.

For the first few days, if you must rinse, rinse your mouth gently. If you experience swelling, apply a cold cloth or an ice bag and call your dentist right away. Ask your dentist about pain medication. You can brush and floss the other teeth as usual.

Dr. Basava will explain any needed follow-up after an extraction. The recovery tips and follow-up are vital to a strong recovery so be sure to ask any questions you have. We're here to help you before, during and after your procedure!

Dentures

Dentures are removable appliances that can replace missing teeth and help restore your smile. If you’ve lost all of your natural teeth, whether from gum disease, tooth decay or injury, replacing missing teeth will benefit your appearance and your health. That’s because dentures make it easier to eat and speak better than you could without teeth—things that people often take for granted.
When you lose all of your teeth, facial muscles can sag, making you look older. Dentures can help fill out the appearance of your face and profile. They can be made to closely resemble your natural teeth so that your appearance does not change much. Dentures may even improve the look of your smile.

Types of dentures:

  • Conventional. This full removable denture is made and placed in your mouth after the remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed, which may take several months.
  • Immediate. This removable denture is inserted on the same day that the remaining teeth are removed. Dr. Basava will take measurements and make models of your jaw during a preliminary visit. You don’t have to be without teeth during the healing period, but may need to have the denture relined or remade after your jaw has healed.
  • Over denture. Sometimes some of your teeth can be saved to preserve your jawbone and provide stability and support for the denture. An over denture fits over a small number of remaining natural teeth after they have been prepared by your dentist. Implants can serve the same function, too.

New dentures may feel awkward for a few weeks until you become accustomed to them. The dentures may feel loose while the muscles of your cheek and tongue learn to keep them in place. It is not unusual to experience minor irritation or soreness. You may find that saliva flow temporarily increases. As your mouth becomes accustomed to the dentures, these problems should go away. Follow-up appointments are generally needed after a denture is inserted so the fit can be checked and adjusted. If any problem persists, particularly irritation or soreness, be sure to consult Trenton Family Dental Care.

Even if you wear full dentures, you still have to practice good dental hygiene. Brush your gums, tongue and roof of your mouth every morning with a soft-bristled brush before you insert your dentures to stimulate circulation in your tissues and help remove plaque.
Like your teeth, your dentures should be brushed daily to remove food particles and plaque. Brushing also can help keep the teeth from staining.

  • You should always take your dentures out at night time this will help reduce the risk of oral infection and keeps your gums healthy.
  • Rinse your dentures before brushing to remove any loose food or debris.
  • Use a soft bristle toothbrush and a non-abrasive cleanser to gently brush all the surfaces of the dentures so they don't get scratched.
  • When brushing, clean your mouth thoroughly—including your gums, cheeks, roof of your mouth and tongue to remove any plaque. This can help reduce the risk of oral irritation and bad breath.
  • When you’re not wearing your dentures, put them in a safe place covered in water to keep them from warping.
  • Occasionally, denture wearers may use adhesives. Adhesives come in many forms: creams, powders, pads/wafers, strips or liquids. If you use one of these products, read the instructions, and use them exactly as directed. We can recommend appropriate cleansers and adhesives; look for products with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Products with the ADA Seal have been evaluated for safety and effectiveness.

If you have any questions about your dentures, or if they stop fitting well or become damaged, contact Trenton Family Dental Care immediately. Be sure to schedule regular dental checkups, too. We'll examine your mouth to see if your dentures continue to fit properly.


Source: American Dental Association Website

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Phone: (513) 988-6316 Email: info@trentondentalcare.net